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Full text of "Curry College"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/currycollege1998unse 




Volume 46 



Curry College 

Milton, Massachusetts 





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Our Place . . . 

The wooded, 120-acre Curry campus is one of the most attractive small 
college campuses in New England. But unlike other isolated suburban 
or rural campuses, Curry is just minutes from one of the most exciting 
cities in the world. 

Only seven miles from downtown Boston, Curry can offer its students 
exceptional cultural and educational advantages. The Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Science, 
the Boston Public Library, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology are just a few of the readily accessible resources 
in the Boston-Cambridge area. Boston is also well known for its his- 
tory and tradition, home of Quincy Market, the Tea Party Ship and the 
Boston Celtics. The opportunity for internships, entertainment and 
education in this New England capital is a significant part of the Curry 
experience. 

And Curry's location has yet another advantage: it is less than two miles 
from the scenic Blue Hills, a natural reservation which offers skiing, 
hiking, horseback riding, and a range of resources for environmental edu- 
cation and recreation. The Curry College campus is a beautiful retreat in 
the woods, with the excitement of the city waiting right outside. 



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South Campus & 
Facilities . . . 

Located on the South Campus, the W. George Kennedy Academic Build- 
ing is a classroom-auditorium facility named in honor of a long-time 
Curry Trustee and benefactor. The Curry Learning Center on the South 
Campus includes an extensive tape library where Program for Advance- 
ment of Learning (PAL) students may avail themselves of textbooks on 
tape, a microcomputer laboratory, classrooms, and offices for PAL in- 
structors. Also on the South Campus are additional residence halls, a 
student center called the ARC (Alumni Recreation Center), the student 
newspaper offices, and a dance studio. 



North and South Campuses together total some 120 wooded acres, tra- 
versed by a 5000-meter cross country and fitness trail, which was con- 
structed in 1983. Centrally located is the Frieda and Joseph Drapkin 
Student Center, which contains a student dining hall, the President's 
Dining Room, a snack bar, a study lounge, the campus bookstore, and 
the central mail facility. 



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North Campus & 
Facilities . . . 

The original Milton campus of Curry College, the North Campus, con- 
tains some fifteen buildings. Included is the John S. Hafer Academic 
Building, which was erected in 1965 and house the majority of Curry's 
classrooms. There are several residence halls on the North Campus 
side of campus as well. Other facilities on the North Campus include 
the Parents Lounge, the science building, the faculty center, the gym- 
nasium, an outdoor swimming pool, numerous tennis courts, the stu- 
dent radio station (WMLN-FM), and the Louis R. Levin Memorial Li- 
brary. Named in honor of a late Curry student, the Levin Library in- 
cludes two microcomputer laboratories for student use. The library 
tower now houses chimes, donated by the Class of 1998, that will be- 
come a campus hallmark in future years. 





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A DEDICATION 



For the past three years, students have found a warm smile, a concerned friend, 
and an ever-helpful hand to greet them in the Office of Student Activities. Peter Hallen, 
Assistant Director in one of the busiest, often chaotic offices on campus, never fails to 
find the time and patience to offer students an attentive ear, suggest an alternative to a 
problem, or just share a joke. 

Pete is also a Residence Director. 

On behalf of the students, administrators, and faculty, the yearbook staff dedicates 
this annual publication to Peter Hallen. 








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MISSION 

Approved unanimously by Curry's Board of Trustees on February 13, 1991, the institutional 
mission of the College is to develop liberally educated persons who are able to gain and to apply knowledge 
humanely, intelligently, and effectively in a complex, changing world. To achieve its mission, Curry College 
promotes individual intellectual and social growth by engaging its students in achieving these educational 
goals: 

THINKING CRITICALLY 

(to analyze, synthesize, hypothesize, evaluate, and to reason quantitatively), 

COMMUNICATING EFFECTIVELY 

(to see, listen, speak, read, and write well), 

UNDERSTANDING CONTEXT 

(to articulate an interdependence of individuals, family, societies, 
history, and the natural environment), 

APPRECIATING AESTHETIC EXPERIENCE 

(to experience and conunent on artistic phenomena), 

DEFINING A PERSONAL IDENTITY 

(to identify strengths and weaknesses as learners, to become increasingly 
self-directed and disciplined, to care for self and others, 
to behave more responsibly, both personally and collectively, 
to become more aware of physical, social, psychological, and spiritual identity), 

EXAMINING VALUE SYSTEMS 

(to formulate and apply standards for behavior, to make informed choices 
with awareness of responsibilities and consequences, to increase tolerance 
and appreciation of diversity), and, 

ADAPTING AND INNOVATING 

(to access information, to anticipate, detect, respond to, and 
create change, and to prepare for lifelong learning). 

The College's curriculum and programs focus on the two hallmarks of the Curry education: a high 
respect for the individuality of every student and a developmental approach to learning that maximizes 
opportunities for achievement. 

Curry College offers academic majors in liberal arts disciplines and in the professional fields. 
Alternatively, an individually-initiated major may be designed when a student's academic and career 
ambitions are not best served by prescribed majors. The College awards the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, and Master of Education degrees. The quality and character of the College's curriculum and 
programs are regularly evaluated in the light of the Curry College statement on educational goals. 

Many academic and social programs enrich and facilitate the Curry education. The Honors 
Program, the Women's Studies Program, the Program for Advancement of Learning, the Essential Skills 
Program, the Field Experience Program, and the Division of Continuing Education are representative of that 
focus on special interests and diverse learning needs. Mindful of each student's imique conibination of 
abilities and potential. Student Life professionals promote a climate in which individuals and groups are 
empowered to become creative and socially responsible. Athletic programs similarly seek to develop 
athlete /scholars who regard scholastic and athletic achievement as congruent and complementary avenues 
to individual fulfillment. 







Academics 



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As students, we are here to gain knowledge so that we 
can go forth and apply that knowledge. 




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HiNKiNG Critically 



Everything we ever say or do is subject to analysis by our peers. They provoke 
thought, and as a result, ideas come to us that we might have not thought of 
ourselves. Students at Curry try to build on their peers' thoughts, but while 
breaking them down they learn to analyze, synthesize, hypothesize,evaluate, and 
to reason quantivetatively during that process. If we as students try to think just on 
the surface of what we are given or told, then our eagerness to think critically and 
look deeper into the information given will be severly tainted. However, Curry's 
continuing quest for their students to think critically allows them to have thorough, 
concise, and well thought-out discussions and comments in the classroom, in social 
events, and even in our workplaces of the future. Our fine staff of professors all 
teach with critical thinking as a major priority in their classes. As a result, the students 
benefit greatly from this approach not only in the short-term but for the rest of their 
lives as well. 







Effective communication is the cornerstone of 
understanding how to be better citizens. 




C 



OMMUNICATING EFFECTIVELY 



Curry College stresses communication in every aspect of student life on campus 
from small teacher to student ratios in the classroom to our large social events. 
Without communication, the messages we are sending may be misinterpreted by 
others; therefore, it is imperative that we become effective communicators in order 
to achieve our goals for ourselves and our community. The ability to speak, see, 
listen, read, and write will allow our students to be better prepared for their ca- 
reers, as well as, enhancing our relationships with family, friends, teachers and 
future employers. While there may be no such thing as a perfect communicator, 
we at Curry try to strive to be the best in all the areas of communicating, and every 
day we are getting closer to achieving our goal. The entire faculty and student 
body will make sure of that. 




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We don't just skim the surface, we dive deep to under- 
stand the innermost workings of mankind. 




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NDERSTANDING CONTEXT 

We as people sometimes seem to have a real understanding of ourselves, our 
thoughts and our ideas. However, we should also strive to better understand the 
thoughts and ideas of our families, our history, our society, and our natural envi- 
ronment. We try not only to understand these thoughts and ideas, but we also try 
to articulate and appreciate these theories as well. We try to achieve this through 
the analysis of our textbooks, our past generations, and all the modern information 
that is provided to us through modern convienences like Telnet, America Online, 
and the Netscape Navigator. By understanding information and our history, we 
are able to get a greater understanding and appreciation of ourselves as well. This 
makes us as Curry students and future graduates more well-rounded people when 
we graduate and will allow us to go farther in life. 




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PPRECIATING AESTHIC EXPERIENCE 



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EFINING A PERSONAL IDENTITY 





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A value system is an essential part of our social lives 
and should be respected by others. 




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XAMiNiNG Value Systems 



Values are very important for an individual to be a complete person. They 
determine how we live our lives, how we relate with our fellow classmates and 
acquaintances, and what we ourselves consider to be right and wrong. When we 
make choices based on our values, we shouldn't just rush into decisions without 
some serious thought and reflection about the decision itself. We must be able to 
live with the decisions we make, so it is imperative that in our minds we are 
confident that the decisions we have made are the right ones. These values are 
used in all classroom, work, and social settings, and are crucial to our fulfillment 
as human beings. Our awareness isn't the key as far as values are concerned. There 
are consequences with our actions, and our actions are based on our values, so we 
must take full responsibility for any actions we take. We must respect each and 
every person's values regardless of whether or not we believe them to be right. 
We need to do this because diversity is a key ingredient to a successful society. 
Hear at Curry, each student is encouraged and supported to fully develop and 
expand on their values. 




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Curry College strives to sharpen your skills with an 
education that will allow you to adapt and innovate. 



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DAFiTNG & Innovating 



Throughout hfe, we constantly find ourselves trying to keep up with all the social 
and technological changes that are happening around us. We must learn to properly 
access the information, respond to it, and make suggestions which will help further 
enhance the idea itself. Here at Curry, the same applies to the students, faculty, 
and staff of the college. On a daily basis, we as students, not only of school but of 
life, strive to take in as much information we can in an attempt to prepare for lifelong 
learning. Adapting takes place in the classroom, in various social settings, in the 
workplace, and every other aspect of life. When we are able to properly adapt as 
human beings, then we have taken huge strides to becoming a complete person. If 
we can go beyond adapting to our environment and learn to make suggestions 
and ideas which will make the environment better, then you will know you play 
an important role in the immediate situation and society in general. Curry strives 
to sharpen their student's skills in both these areas. 




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You can be an individual at Curry College and still be 
part of a great group of friends . . . 




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A fixture with the sights and 
sounds surrounding Curry 
College baseball, head coach 
Jack Vallely coached his 51st 
season in Milton this past 
spring. The Colonels com- 
pleted the year with a 10-15-1 
record. Althoughitdidn'tmeet 
pre-season expectations, the 
squad managed to win at least 
10 games for the 39th time in 51 
years. 

The season opening double- 
header vs. Bates College, the 
team Vallely defeated last sea- 
son to earn his 700th career 
win, was cancelled due to an 
early spring snowfall. The 
Curry nine eventually got the 
bats swinging and the gloves 
stinging with a comfortable 20- 
1 win against Mass. Pharmacy 
on March 25th. Senior captain 
Ed Hagerty provided the of- 
fense and defense going 2-2 
with 6 RBI's and combining 
with freshman Chip Raines 
(Waltham, MA) to pitch a 5 
inning one hitter. Curry's bats 
grew silent during the next four 
games losing all four by two 
runs or one. 

The winning ways contin- 
ued as the Purple and White 
put together a modest three 
game winning streak, defeat- 
ing Emerson, and Common- 
weatlh Coast Conference foes 
Eastern Nazarene, and 
Wentworth. Junior shortstop 
Mike Osso (Shelton, CT) pro- 
vided most of the offense dur- 
ing the streak connecting for 
nine hits, including a three hit 
effort vs. Eastern Nazarene. In 
the Wentworth win, sopho- 
more catcher Corey Santos 
(Taunton, MA) made sure his 
only homerun of the season 
counted. He hit a grand slam 
in the fifth inning of a 6-3 win. 

On Aprill 5th, coach Vallely 
coached his 1000th baseball 
game when he wrote in the 
starting nine against visiting 
Nichols College. Only Eastern 
Connecticut State's Ed 
Holowaty has coached more 



Baseball 



Division III games in New En- 
gland. Curry lost the game 4-1. 
Hit with an 8 game losing 
streak midway through the sea- 
son, Curry bounced backed 
with timely CCC wins against 
Gordon College 12-0 on April 
18th and Arma Maria on April 
21st. These two wins kept 
Vallely's gang in the hunt for 
the Commonwealth Coast 
Conference tournament. In the 
win vs. Gordon, Hagerty once 
again baffled batters with his 
arm striking out seven in a two- 
hit complete game perfor- 
mance. Against Anna Maria, 
sophomore right-hander Scott 
Constable, Ciury's ace in wait- 
ing, pitched well enough to win 
but the bats went into over- 
time as Curry pulled out an 
exciting 10-9 decision in 11 in- 
nings. Junior Jay Conners 
(Springfield, VA) came in re- 
lief of Constable and earned 
the victory. Constable had 
struck out eight in nine innings 
of work. 

Heading into the final week 
of conference action, the Colo- 
nels found themselves at New 
England College for a game 
with the Pilgrims. In a season 
when the bats seemed incon- 
sistent, this day was no excep- 
tion as Curry blasted NEC 19- 
3. Senior Mike Aubin (West 
Warwick, RI) hit the first pitch 
of the game to dead straight 
away center to set the pace. 
Santos collected three hits, in- 
cluding his team record 14th 
and 15th doubles of the season 
and freshman rightf ielder Sean 
Connolly connected for this 
third four bagger of the year. 
Sophomore second baseman 
Eric Ferris (Taunton, MA) went 
3-4 with 3 doubles. 

Making a run at its second 
consecutive CCC Champion- 
ship and third in the last four 
years, Curry was a five seed 
and had to travel to Nichols 
College the four seed for a 
quarterfinal game. The Colo- 
nels motivation for another 







banner was strong as the bats 
remained hot in a 17-3 win. 
Sean Connolly collected five 
hits to raise his batting average 
to .524 and Mike Osso broke 
Kevin O'Connell's '89 single 
season hit record of 49 going 4- 
6 to pace the Purple and White. 
O'Connell is also the head 
coach at Nichols. Eight players 
collected at least two hits in a 
25 hit attack. Nichols top 
pitcher was hit by a line drive 
in the first inning of the game 
forcing him out of action. 
Curry's advance in the tourna- 
ment set up a game vs. Roger 
Williams the one seed. 

In the CCC Semifinal, the 
Colonels fell behind 5-1 after 
three innings and never recov- 
ered in a 9-4 loss. Freshman 
Mark Ruane (Lynn, MA) col- 
lected a team best three hits in 
the loss. 

Freshman rightfielder Sean 
Connolly was Curry's leading 
hitter this season batting .517 
(45-87), the third best single 
season average ever. Junior 
shortshop Mike Osso accumu- 
lated the most hits (52), second 
most RBI's (37), and third most 
runs (32) while batting .452 
with 5 HR's tying A.J. Vieira's 
single season record. Corey 
Santos collected a team record 
15 doubles and knocked in 31 
RBI's while hitting .423. 

As a team Curry batted a 
conference best .368 and was 
second in the CCC in runs 
scored per game at 8.10. 

Senior pitcher Ed Hagerty, 
who was named Curry Col- 
lege Male Scholar Athlete of 
the Year and senior 
centerf ielder Mike Aubin, who 
is among the all-time leaders 
in many categories are the only 
two seniors on coach Vallely's 
1998 roster. 

Juniors Mike Osso, Jay 
Conners, and sophomores 
Scott Constable and Corey 
Santos were named quad cap- 
tains for the 1999 season. 





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Team Record: 
10-15-1 

Commonweatlth Coast 

Conference Record: 

5-4 

All Conference Selections: Senior Ed 
Hagerty (Holbrook, MA) First Team, 
sophomore Scott Constable (Randolph, 
MA) and freshman Sean Connolly 
(Watertown, MA) Second Tean\. 




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Women's Basketball 



NO. NAME 

00 Nicole Leckie 

10 Junie Pierre-Louis 

11 Heather Sprague 

12 Liz Londergan 

14 Theresa Hourihan 

20 Jen Monaghan 

22 Candace Jacques 

24 Tricia Folan 

32 Jen Lawlor 

34 Kelly Allen 

44 Angela Mattola 



CLASS POS. HT. HOMETOWN (H.S.) 

Fr. F 5' 10 Gales Ferry, CT (Ledyard) 

Fr. F 5' 10 AUston, MA (Brighton) 

So. G 5'6 Oakland, ME (Messalonskee) 

So. G 5'6 Hull, MA (Hull) 

Fr, G 5'6 Agawam, MA (Holyoke Catholic) 

Jr. F/G 5'8 Lowell (Lowell) 

Fr. G 5'1 Clinton, CT (Morgan School) 

Fr. F 5' 8 Portland, ME (Deering) 

Sr. G 5'7 Yorktown Heights, NY (J. F. K.) 

So. F/C 5'10 Cape Elizabeth, ME (Cape Elizabeth) 

So. F/C 6'0 Everett, MA (Everett) 



Head Coach: Terri MuUiken (New Hampshire '86), 4th season 
Assistant Coach: Paul Bonitto (Bridgewater State '87 ), 1st season 
Captains: Jen Lawlor, Jen Monaghan, Kelly AUen 




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Men's Basketball 




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Cheerleading 










First year head coach Ron 
Zangari lead his Colonels to a 
0-10 mark this season. The 
record doesn't represent the 
way the team played. 

Although Curry did not 
record any wins on the grid- 
iron, many players received 
post-season honors. Senior 
captain Jason Stanton earned 
Eastern Collegiate Football 
Conference First-Team honors 
at linebacker while teammates 
sophomore return specialist 
John Barr and sophomore line- 
man Aubrey Beavers made the 



Football 

Second-Team in offense and 
defense respectively. Offen- 
sive guard and senior captain 
John Bateman earned Second- 
Team acclaim. 

Team Most Valuable 
Player went to senior captain 
Jason Stanton who became 
Curry's all-time leader in tack- 
les this season with 256. 
Rookie of the Year honors 
went to Chris LeBlanc, a 5-10 
defensive back who had 4 in- 
terceptions including one for 
a touchdown. The Dr. John S. 
Hafer Award was received by 



Senior captain John Bateman, 
the anchor of the offensive line 
this season played in all of 
Curry's 10 games providing 
blocking for his teammates. 
The Dr. John S. Hafer award is 
awarded to a player who ex- 
hibits excellence in football, 
scholarship, leadership and 
citizenship. The O'Connor 
Award was accepted by Se- 
nior running back Keith 
Shepard for his significant 
achievements in his lifetime 
and as a gentlemen of the high- 
est order. 









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Ice Hockey 



# 


Player 


CI 


P 


Ht 


Wt 


Hometown 


Last Team 


2 


Justin Delvecchio 


Fr. 


D 


6-0 


185 


Wallingford, CT 


Conn. Clippers 


3 


A! Barzykowski 


Fr. 


F 


5-0 


165 


Revere, MA 


Revere HS 


4 


Jeff Wright 


So. 


F 


5-8 


155 


Shrewsbury, MA 


Shrewsbury HS 


5 


Aaron Eastman (C) 


Sr. 


D 


6-0 


190 


Gloucester, MA 


Gloucester HS 


6 


John Labanara 


So. 


D 


5-11 


205 


Belmont, MA 




8 


John Berriola 


Fr. 


F 


6-2 


200 


Medford, MA 


O'Neil Lighting 


9 


Mike Giordano 


Fr. 


F 


6'0 


205 


Wilmington, MA 


Valley Jr. Warriors 


10 


Bill Hart (C) 


Sr. 


D 


5-10 


190 


Newton, MA 


Newton North HS 


11 


Sean Whelan 


Fr. 


F 


5-10 


170 


Hamden, CT 


Winchendon School 


12 


Jarred Redford 


Jr. 


F 


5-10 


170 


East Boston, MA 


East Boston HS 


13 


Colin Doherty 


Sr. 


F 


5-10 


140 


Revere, MA 


Revere HS 


14 


Caleb Wyse (C) 


Sr. 


F 


5-8 


180 


Cleveland, OH 


Cleve. Jr. Barons 


16 


Michael Weis (C) 


Sr. 


F 


5-10 


170 


So. Windsor. CT 


Trinity Pawling 


18 


Damon Ferranti 


Jr. 


F 


5-9 


205 


Waltham, MA 


Matignon HS 


19 


Michael Chiaradonna Jr. 


F 


5-10 


180 


East Boston, MA 


Savio Prep 


20 


Tony Marchi 


So. 


F 


5-10 


200 


W. Roxbury. MA 


Catholic Mem. HS 


21 


Tim Flynn 


So. 


F 


5-10 


170 


Reading, MA 


Reading HS 


22 


Pat Woodard 


Fr. 


D 


5-10 


175 


E.Longmeadow, MA 


Conn. Clippers 


23 


Steve Delfomo 


Fr. 


G 


6-0 


180 


Braintree, MA 


Winchendon School 


24 


Scott Tkachuk 


Fr. 


F 


5-11 


180 


Hampstead, NH 


New Hampton Prep 


25 


Joe Amendola 


Fr. 


F 


5-8 


165 


Norwood. MA 


Norwood HS 


26 


Robert DeMarco 


So. 


G 


5-11 


180 


Winthrop, MA 


Hebron Academy 


27 


Robert McDade 


Jr. 


F 


5-11 


175 


Watertown, MA 


Watertown HS 


28 


Jake Lamont 


Jr. 


D 


6-4 


215 


Arlington, MA 


Arlington HS 


29 


Ed Torri 


So. 


G 


5-9 


180 


Lincoln, MA 


Rivers School 


30 


Jason Altavesta 


Jr. 


G 


5-8 


175 


Hampton, NH 


Matignon HS 


34 


Mike Manganaro 


Jr. 


G 


6-5 


275 


Halifax, MA 


North Quincy HS 


- 


Jim Najarian 


So. 








Woburn, MA 






Head Coach: 


Mark 


Tarmey (UMass-Amherst '82), 2nd season 






Asst Coaches: 


Joe DeRoeve 


(Stone 


hill '9 


6), 2nd season 







Captains: 



Brendan Murphy (UMass-Dartmouth'96), 1st season 
Aaron Eastman, Bill Hart, Caleb Wyse, Mike Weis, 













Team Record: 
11-13-1 



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First year head coach Kevin 
Pezanowski (Methuen, MA) 

turned around a team that won 
just three games a year ago into 
a six game winner in 1998. 
Curry's six wins are the second 
most in team history and niost 
since the 1996 team won five 
games. 

The Colonels jumped off to 
their best start ever winning 
three straight against Univer- 
sity of New England 14-6, 
Mass. Maritime 1 5-6, and Clark 
15-12. Two main reasons for 
the quick start was the combi- 
nation of old and new. Senior 
attackman Rich Walsh (Gar- 
den City, NY) tallied 10 goals 
and 3 assists in the first week, 
only to be outdone by his fresh- 
man teammate and midfielder 
Tony Gashi (Yorktown, NY) 
with 13 goals and 4 assists. Also 
contributing to the effort was 
freshman Scott Tkachuk 
(Hampstead, NH) who was 
named Commonwealth Coast 
Conference player of the week 
for his 5 goal 4 assist effort. 

In the weeks that followed, 
Curry's fast start was a thing of 
the past, losing six of their next 
eight dropping their record to 



Lacrosse 



5-6. Although the team was 
wavering, individuals contin- 
ued to have fine seasons. Walsh 
tied the Curry record for most 
goals in a game with 8 scores in 
a 19-7 at Franklin Pierce and 
Gashi was named CCC Rookie 
of the Week twice. In goal for 
the Colonels, junior Evan 
Kolkos estabhshed a new single 
season save record with 312 
and was ranked among the 
Division III national leaders. 
He was named to the Com- 
monwealth Coast Conference 
First Team. 

Not qualifying for the CCC 
playoffs, Curry did manage to 
salvage a CCC win over visit- 
ing Salve Regina University on 
April 25 with a 15-10 outcome. 
Gashi and Walsh provided the 
offense combining for 9 goals 
and 3 assists. Kolkos made 16 
saves. To finish the season 
Walsh led all scorers with 44 
points on 35 goals and 9 assists 
and Gashi checked in with 28 
goals and 14 assists for 42 
points. Walsh's 44 points are the 
seventh highest in team his- 
tory and his 35 goals are the 
fourth most. Gashi's 42 points 



are the most by a freshman 
since Curry's all-time points 
leader Peter DeBusschere '94 
tallied 54 points as a frosh in 
1991, 

Defensively, Kolkos held 
opponents at bay all season 
posting a 12.34 GAA. His 
defenseman in front of him 
provided solid play aU season. 
Leading the way was senior 
captain Scott Delaney 
(Dedham, MA) and junior 
Mike Tanton. Delaney 
paralized opponents with his 
masterful defense, while 
Tanton provided intense de- 
fense with a smooth offensive 
touch. Tanton scored 2 goals 
and added 7 assists this sea- 
son. He was named the teams 
Most Valuable Player and was 
selected to the Commonwealth 
Coast Conference Second 
Team. 

Pezanowski's squad will 
miss the experience of seniors, 
Brian Castellano ( Natick, 
MA), Scott Delaney, Michael 
Disario (Brookline, MA), Brad 
Gleason (Fairfield, CT), Rich 
Walsh, and Greg Zornow 
(Hyde Park, MA). 









Womfn's 


Soccer 


NO. 


NAME 


YEAR 


POS. 


HOMETOWN 




Mary Armata 


So. 


G 


Wilmington, MA 




Nancy DiPanni 


Fr. 


G 


Lynnfield, MA 


2 


Jill Gordon 


Fr. 


F 


Livingston, NJ 


3 


Debbie Saunders 


Jr. 


B 


Whitman, MA 


4 


Chandra Burke 


Fr. 


B 


So. Weymouth, MA 


5 


KeUy Wickham 


Fr. 


F 


Natick, MA 


6 


Mysta Broughton 


Fr. 


M 


Tetonia, ID 


8 


Heather Sprague 


So. 


M 


Oakland, ME 


9 


Karen MacKay 


Sr. 


M 


Foxboro, MA 


10 


Kendra Shaw 


Jr. 


F 


IsUp, NY 


11 


Jenn Lawlor 


Sr. 


G 


Yorktown Heights, NY 


12 


Shilo Randall 


Fr. 


B 


Brant Rock, MA 


13 


Miranda Dewling 


So. 


M/B 


Revere, MA 


14 


Christina Graves 


Jr. 


M/F 


Easthampton, MA 


16 


Donna Walsh 


Fr. 


B 


Weymouth, MA 


17 


Barbara Spadea 


Fr. 


F 


W. Brookfield, MA 


18 


Amy Zawatski 


So. 


F 


Hopkinton, MA 


19 


Hilary Baker 


Fr. 


M 


Hingham, MA 


20 


Jen Monaghan 


Jr. 


B 


Lowell, MA 


21 


Sarah Donahoe 


Sr. 


B 


Kingston, MA 


23 


Tricia Folan 


Fr. 


F 


Portland, ME 


Head Coach: 


Andrea Zeigler, Curry 


'91, (Fifth Season) 


Assistants: 


Michael O'Connor and Karen Callaghan 






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NO. 


NAME 


YEAR 


POS. 


HT. 


WT. 


HOMETOWN 


00 


Chris Mazzone 


Sr. 


G 


6'3 


200 


Littleton, MA 





Matt Consentino 


Fr. 


G 


5'9 


180 


Dedham, MA 


1 


Tony Caruso 


Sr. 


G 


6'0 


180 


Pembroke, MA 


2 


Peter Magazzu 


Jr. 


B 


5'8 


145 


Natick, MA 


3 


E.J. Catala 


Fr. 


M 


5'7 


145 


Wallingford, CT 


4 


Jacob Wolman 


So. 


B 


5'11 


155 


Wayne, NJ 


7 


Chris Pantano 


So. 


B 


5'7 


165 


Worcester, MA 


8 


Faheem Nasser 


Fr. 


B 


5'10 


160 


Nairobi 


9 


Jon Scott 


Fr. 


M 


5'10 


185 


Framingham, MA 


10 


Mike J.SuUivan 


Sr. 


M 


5'9 


160 


Wethersfield, CT 


12 


Mike Tanton 


Jr. 


F 


5-7 


185 


E. Rockaway, NY 


13 


Thomas Van DeVelde 


Fr. 


B 


5'8 


155 


Winchester, MA 


16 


Paul Collins 


Sr. 


B 


5'10 


175 


Milton, MA 


17 


Gary Johnson 


Fr. 


M 


6'5 


205 


Gloucester, MA 


18 


Drew Reynolds 


Jr. 


B 


6'1 


165 


Cromwell, CT 


19 


Kyle Harris 


Fr. 


B 


5-7 


140 


Humacao, PR 


20 


Chris Reino 


Jr. 


F 


5'10 


200 


Kenilworth, NJ 


21 


Mike R. Sullivan 


So. 


B 


6'0 


170 


Dracut, MA 


22 


Sean Timlin 


Fr. 


F 


6'1 


170 


Milton, MA 


23 


Luke Rameaka 
Jonathan Daly 


Jr. 


F 


6'1 


165 


Warwick, RI 



Head Coach: Peter Vasiliadis, UMass-Boston '87 
Assistant: Matt Sills, Curry '96 








After a 1-6 start during their 
annual spring break trip to Fort 
Myers, FL, not many people 
would project this team to go 
on a win a second consecutive 
Commonwealth Coast Confer- 
ence championship, but it was 
a long season and law of aver- 
ages caught up in the favor of 
the Lady Colonels as they fin- 
ished with a 19-19 record and 
back-to-back CCC crowns. 

The results of action 
occured down south ruled as 
the theme for the rest of the 
season. Heading back to New 
England with a 1-6 mark, head 
coach Bruce Weckworth's 
squad casually reeled off four 



Softball 



straight wins to flirt with the 
.500 mark for the first time in 
'98. Not until April 4th against 
CCC foe Wentworth did the 
Purple and White hit the equi- 
librium point with a convinc- 
ing 14-6 win. Two days later, 
Curry surged past the split 
mark with a 15-7 win against 
Emerson College giving the 
squad its thrid win in a row en 
route to a five game winning 
streak before an 11-5 loss to 
CCC leader Regis. That loss 
sent the team down again, los- 
ing six of its next eight games. 
The year of streaks reared its 
ugly head again spinning the 
Lady Colonels to the opposite 



^^^ 



side of the winners circle in 
five of its next seven leaving 
the team with a record of 15-19 
heading into the final week of 
the season. 

Playing admirably in the 
Tufts Invitational against 
NCAA bound teams. Tufts and 
Amherst and splitting two 
games from a solid Colby 
squad prepared Weckworth's 
team for the upcoming CCC 
tournament. 

Curry went on to win its 
second consecutive CCC title 
by defeating Salve Regina 5-2 
in the championship game and 
Gordon College 1 -0 in the semi- 
finals. 







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Team Record: 
19-19 

Commonwealth Coast Conference 
Record: 6-3 



Finish in CCC Championship: Defeated 
Salve Regina University 5-2 to win sec- 
ond consecutive CCC Championship. 
Team was #3 seed. 

ALL-CONFERENCE SELECTIONS: 
Trica Larivee CCC Player of the Year, 
MichelleMaioccaCCCPitcherof the Year 




Vx' 






Women's Tennis 



Marlene Samuelson's ten- 
nis team opened the 1997 cam- 
paign with a 5-4 win over Suf- 
folk. The rest of the season was 
marred by injuries to experi- 
enced players and younger 
players. The Colonels recorded 
a 7-2 victory against UMass- 
Boston October 3rd. Amy 
Oriscello, Lauren Kennedy, 
and Jamie Sotsky each won 
their singles and doubles 
matches to pace Curry. For the 
season, Oriscello lead the team 
in both singles wins (8) and 
doubles (7). Teammate Lauren 
Kennedy was close behind 
with five wins in singles play 
and five in doubles action. 



Oriscello was the team's 
most valuable player with her 
15-15 record and Courtney 
Wahl, who begann the season 
as a true novice won most im- 
proved honors. She finished 
the season with four wins. 

An overall young team, the 
Colonels should be ready to 
step up their play next season 
with many returning for their 
sophomore seasons. Playing 
this season were sophomores 
Jaimie Sotsky and co-captain 
Lauren Kennedy and freshmen 
Julie Boyle, Gannon Ginsburg, 
Alison Massaro, Chandra Mor- 
gan. Amy Oriscello, and 
Courtney Wahl. 




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Men's Tennis 



The 1998 Men's Tennis 
team ended its season with a 
2-13 record. The record how- 
ever was no indication of liow 
hard the team played and what 
they achieved throughout the 
season. 

First year head coach Julio 
Cesar de Carvalho, a former 
national team tennis player 
from his native Cape Verde 
Island, taught a team with no 
senior leadership how to play 
together and meet personal 
goals. Fluent in five lan- 
guages, Creole, English, 
French, Portugese, and Span- 
ish de Carvalho must have 
gotten his point across some- 
how as the Colonels won their 
first Commonwealth Coast 
Conference match in two sea- 



sons with a 5-4 triumph over 
Roger Williams on April 16th. 
Playing well for Curry this 
season were freshman singles 
players Ben Hoffman who col- 
lected 11 victories in 16 
matches and Jeremy Lorenz, 
who won six matches this sea- 
son. Team captain and junior 
Bryan Culp saved his best for 
last as he won a singles match 
in the CCC tournament de- 
feating a player from Nichols 
1-6, 6-4, 6-3. Also earning a 
win in CCC tournament play 
was Lorenz who was victori- 
ous over his Colby-Sawyer foe 
2-6,6-1,7-6(7-4). Thetwowins 
in tournament play marked 
the teams best performance in 
two seasons as they placed 5th 
in the tournament. 







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Team Record: 
2-13 

Commonwealth Coast Conference 

Reocrd: 

1-7 

Commonwealth Coast Conference 

Tournament Finish; 

5TH / 4pts. 




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Curry College 

Clubs and Organizations 

Alcohol Beverage Committee (ABC) 

Campus Activities Board (CAB) 

Colonels Corner 

Commuter Club 

Currier Times 

Curry Arts journal 

Curry College Nursing Association (CCNA) 

Curry Theatre 

Golf Club 

Hillel 

International Club 

King Society 

Multicultural Club 

New England Adventure Society 

Newman Club 

Project Share 

Mens and Women's Rugby Clubs 

Student Government Association (SGA) 

Student Ambassadors 

Yearbook Staff 







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T U D E N T 
LIFE 






Freshman 
Orientation 



The orientation program welcomes freshmen 
students to Curry College prior to the start of classes. It is 
an important time for students to become familiar with he 
campus and Boston area, meet faculty, staff, and other new 
students, confirm course registration, and receive aca- 
demic advising. 

Parents orientation is held simultaneously with new 
student orientation. A special program for parents 
provides the opportunity to learn more about Curry 
College and have questions answered by appropriate staff 
members. 







Freshman 
Orientation 



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Residence 








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Through the 
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4 




Ariana M. Afnan 

Waite Hill, Ohio 

Management /Accounting 

To all of my friends, especially Sara: "If you have 
one true friend you have more than your share" - 
Thomas Fuller. To Spenser: "Love doesn't make 
the world ro 'round- love is vifhat makes the ride 
worth while" -Franklin P. Jones. To Mom & Dad: 
Thank you for all that you have done for me. 1 love 
you both very much. 



Tressa Elizabeth Antworth 

Ridgewood, New Jersey 

Health Education/Psychology & Biology 

My family- Thank you for your love and support. 

My friends- You have enriched my life. 1 will 

always cherish the memories. 



Stephen Armarly 

Miami, Florida 
Communication 




Erich S. Bachman 

Danbury, Connecticut 
Communication/Politics & History 
Four years c^me and gone- time to say so long. 
Bachman 

5 at 9 *News Channel 3. Thanx Mom, Dad, Grandma, 
Grandpa, and Mac. 



Cheryl A. Barrett 

Mattapan, Massachusetts 
Management/Human Resource Manage- 
ment 
Mom- Thanks for your support. And to all of you 
who have given me the strength to go on GOD, OL, 
JW, YH, JJ, UL, JH, HC, BC, & DS. 



\ 



John M. Bateman 

Pembroke, Massachusetts 

Criminal Justice/Psychology 

Thanks Mom, Dad, Paul, Missy. The Brotherhood 

Keith & Eric. Curry Football 73. KS keeping th 

faith. AB&DH Curry Beach. 



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CRAIG J. BENSON 

New York, New York 
Psychology 

Vhen are you gonna cut open the watermelon?" 
-Chico Marx 

iverybody's Got Something to Hide Except Me 

id My Monkey." 

-John Lennon and 
Paul McCartney 



JENNIFER BLACK 

Brockton, Massachusettes 
Nursing 



MALIK K. BROWN 

Bourne, Massachusetts 

Management 




JEFFREY G. BUXTON 

Orwell, Vermont 

Communication /Radio Broadcasting 
^e time has come to say goodbye, but not forever, 
wish to thank everyone for making my 4 years 
;re at Curry the best of my hfe. Special thanks 
3es to Alan Frank for giving me the motivation to 
icceedinlife. Mom & Dad- thanks for everything, 
ove you. Matt, Sean, Dutch, Scott, & Ben -AKA= 
AWGS. Thanks for the late night conferences. 
[el- thanks for being there and for being you. 
urry Rugby lives in us all. Peace! I'm Gone! 



DAVID J. CALAFIORE 

Chesire, Connecticut 
Communication 



JENNIFER CALARDO 

Patchogue, New York 

Sociology /Justice Studies 

The head learns new things, but the heart forever 

practices old experience. NL, MH, AT- Love You 

Guys. 



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^'m 




Kathleen M. Callahan 

Southold, New York 
Management/ Accounting 

"Don't do something you'll live to regret" 
"Live Life to the fullest" To my tweety bird friend 
- Thanks for always being there. 



Jennifer Anne Camerlin 
Reading, Massachusetts 
Psychology 
Thanks to all my friends for a great four years. 
I'll never forget talking all night. I love you guys. 
I'll miss you. Thanks Mom and Dad for giving me 
this opportunity. Good luck Larry, 1 hope you 
have as much fun as 1 did. 



Peter Breslin Campbell 

Woodbridge, Connecticut 

English/British & American Literature 

"And 1 was unaware." 

-Thomas Hardy 
Thanks: Family, Jacquie and Dr. Hunter 




Susan Lynn Carmichael 

Canton, Massachusetts 

Sociology /Elementary Education & Special 

Needs 
"Look at us holdin on, . . . still goin strong." 

-S. Twain 
Great memories! 
Family, thanks for the support. Luv ya! 



Anthony F. Caruso 

Pembroke, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice/Psychology 



Brian P. Castellano 

Natick, Massachusetts 
Management 

RA, RGA, ABC, lax facil. Thanks Mom, Dad 
family & friends. 1 couldn't have done it withou 
your support. 







Joseph N. Castro 

Boston(Hyde Park), Massachusetts 

Nursing 

'I'll give you so many good reasons to capture a 



Iream..." 



-Lang/Peiken 



JoETTE Louise Cavanna 
Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 
Education/Preschool Education 

To all my friends at Curry: 1 had a great four years. 

Mom + Dad, 1 love you both with all my heart and 

1 am very thankful. Thanks M, M, A, N, F and 

Gram. 

"Live life to the fullest." 



Kaiya N. Clemons 

RosUndale, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

My four years at Curry have been both rewarding 
and challenging. I am a better person today 
because of that experience. 




James Wesley Cook Jr. 

Vicksburg, Mississippi 
Management 
"Mom and Dad, thanks for everything." Teaching 
me that all people are eye to eye and that no one 
is better than anyone else will help me do many 
wonderful things. Everybody out there work 
hard, be nice, and smile! 



Jennifer Haberland Cray 

Amherst, Massachusetts 

Managemen t/ Sports Managemen t 

"I never think of the future. It comes soon enough." 

Thanks Mom, Dad, Bill, Jess, JR, MC, MM, DD, MC, 

JB, Dutch, and many others. Love you guys. 



Stacy Ann Crocker 

Burhngton, Massachusetts 

Psychology 



\ 







Harshene Cunningham 

Mattapan, Massachusetts 

Criminal Justice 

First I would like to thank God. To all my family 

members: Mom, Dad, lil bro.. thank you for the 

support. 

Thank you to the D-side Family. 
Peace 



James K. Curtin III 

South Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Communication /Public Relations 



Kimberly Ann D alton 

Braintree, Massachusetts 
Nursing/Psychology 




Scott M. Delaney 

Dedham, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice/Politics&History 



LoRi J. DiPipPO 

Thornwood, New York 
Management/Accounting 

Mom, Thank You. To all my friends. ..We Made 
ManyMemories. KR- words can't describe. JOHN- 
you brighten my everyday. I Love You! 



Colin M. Doherty 

Revere, Massachusettes 

Criminal fustice/Communication/ 

Politics&History 



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Lauren J. Domingos 

West Bridgewater, Massachusetts 
Psychology /Sociology 

The frog is stayin." 

owe this all to my family. Aaron, you mean the 

(7orld to me. SC, HD, MC, KS, EM, JB- never forget 

ou. 



MicHELE Joy Douglas 

Dix Hills, New York 

Sociology /Psychology 
To Shelby, Kristine, Stacy, Katie, Karen, Danielle, 
Chrisy, Neely, Ken, Karen M., Krista, Lori T., Lori 
D., Nikki, Pope, Chris, Mike, Rugby Sisters, Milton 
Hall girls. Tommy H., Jay S., Rugby Brothers, and 
the rest of Curry: Thanks for the best four years 
of my life! "Think positive and party good." Last 
but not least, thanks Mom and Dad for being there. 
Thanks Ben, Andy, Zobler, Ben, Suzie + Joan. 



Walter S. Dunbar 

Brooks ville, Florida 
Management /Visual Arts 




Kevin M. Duquette 

Walpole, Massachusetts 
Biology/Environmental Science 



Brian R. Eckhoff 

Woodbine, Maryland 
Criminal Justice 



Peter Ely 

Wayland, Massachusetts 
Politics & History 



SJ 



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Jessica A. Esposito 

Ryegate, Vermont 

Communication 
Many of you I will never forget. 
JC,MCJB,ALJR,BD,AF- Luv Ya Lots. Thanks to 
family. Women's Rugby Rules. 



Erin M. Foley 

Rome, New York 
Psychology 

To laugh often to love often- to know that one life 
has breathed easier because you have lived-this is 
to have succeeded. 



Jamie lynn Friske 

Leominster, Massachusetts 

Management 

Thanks Mom & Dad. I made it. CCC CHAMPS 
'97. C.H. Thanks Bruce. 4-5-96. It's been a great 
four years! It can only get better from here! #9 




Krista Ann Frongillo 

Saugus, Massachusetts 

Health Education 

Thanks Mom and Dad, 1 love you.KM,LT,NW,LG, 

LD,NJ never forget the good times. You guys are 

the best and 1 love you. 



Michaelle Frost 

Brockton, Massachusetts 

Management jEntrepreneurshi-p 

333 Richie- always and forever. Thanks Mom &c 

Dad. It was fun- LP,LM,JM,JF,JI- no more lori! 

Miss You Pupa, RIP Diego 



sLf^ 



J.T. Frucci 

Hingham, Massachusetts 
Management 
My time her at Curry is up.Thanks to my friends, 
you know who you are. Thanks for all the good ' 
times that are memories for now on. Co-Editor of ' 
the Currier Times- Did it! Thank you Jim for 
everything you have taught me. Prof. Vicki i 
Fatouros, thanks for your awesome teaching. I ! 
will never forget your classes & what I learned in i 
them. Last but not least, thank you to my mom. 
Dad, & Bro's for everything. 



:m^^*^ 



'v 




Brian Scott Gambardella 

North Providence, Rhode Island 

Management /Applied Computing 
Have you driven a Ford Lately?" 



James Arthur Gay 

MilHs, Massachusetts 
Politics & History/Religion 

"Sweet Thing" Commuter Club President- Junior 
Class Represenative- Member of Alexander Gra- 
ham Bell Honor Society. 



BEVERLY D. George 

Pheonix, Arizona 

Nursing/Biology /Psychology 




Stanley C. Gerald 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Nursing 



Brad Gleason 

Fairfield, Connecticut 

Management 



Sarah Elisabeth Godfrey 

Lanesboro, Massachusetts 
Nursing 







Deanna M. Griffin 

Randolph, Massachusetts 
Nursing/Sociology 



Robert Griffin 

Chelsea, Massachusetts 
Sociology /Criminal Justice 



Jacqueline Mary Hamill 

Stewart Manor, New York 
Communication/Sociology 

Thanks for all your support and encouragement 
Mom, Dad, Dan, Chris, Kerry, and Carol! You will 
always be in my heart. I couldn't have asked for 
a better family. 




Daniqua S. Hamilton 

Brockton, Massachusetts 
Health Education 



Ryan F. Hanson 

South Portland, Maine 
Visual Arts /Communication 






Tracy Marie Hatch 

Roslindale, Massachusetts 
Psychology /Elementary Education 
Thank you Mom for everything! To R, D, M, D, A, 
J, D, B, C and David, Jacqueline, Zachary + 
Monica, I Love You All and couldn't have done it 
without you! To Tina and Andrea- you guys are 
the best.*Daytona Beach* Maureen, I'll miss our 
classes together. Chrissy- have fun! Sue- We 
Made It!! 



^,0^ 





Steven A. Herrick 

Syracuse, New York 
Management/Marketing 



CURTISS B. HiCKCOX III 

West Hartford, Connecticut 

Communication/Creative Writing 
Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in. 

Thoreau, Walden 
Thank you Mom, Dad and Kitty. 



Keri Ann Victoria Hinchey 

Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Nursing/Women's Studies 
To Dad, Mom & JW- thank you for all your love & support. 
Neels-On-Wheels,yourthebest! 
JBTCLGSTJMMWJDJCKZJCENSNSS I'll never forget 
Lombard, whereitallstarted. Airport beachShadySeanl98 
DA firealarms bayroot halloween Spring fling NJ's floor 
tokin smokin gettin wasted and all the times in between. 
Thanks for all the great times and memories! Remember, 
"When two lives touch, they can never be fully seperated." 




Joanna Y, Hollow ay 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Communication /Public Relations 
To everyone that know WBWBD. 
For those that don't peace to you. Thank you to 
God, my mother & family for the support. To CL, 
MJM, SB, CB, MGG, CI, KD & AL. 



Craig W. Holz 

Greenwich, Connecticut 

Management 
"Freedom is never granted, it is won." -APR 
The last four years at Curry have been great. 
Thank you Mom, Dad & Megan. 



Macy Elizabeth Enright Hussey 

Midlothian, Virginia 

Nursing 
"No pessimist ever discovered the secrets of the 
stars or sailed to an uncharted land, or opened a new 
heaven to the human spirit." 



*<^ 1(153 



'A 




Isabel Dinah Iberkleid G. 

La Paz, Bolivia 

Sociology /Applied Computing 

"A journey of a 1000 miles, starts with a single step." 

- Lao Tsu 
My four years at Curry have been unforgettable, 
thanks to those who were there to make it 
happen. ..you know who you are! To my family, 
there's notenough space or words to express how 
much I love & thank you! 



Neely Ann Jameson 

Norwell, Massachusetts 

Biology 



Pamela Leigh Jones 

Brookline, Massachusetts 
Sociology 




Tammy Jutras 

Lewiston, Maine 

Nursing 






MicHAELLE Frost 

Newton, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

"If you think you are beaten you are. If you think you dare 
not you don' t. Success begins with your own will. .. It's all 
in your state of mind. Life battles are not always won by 
those who are stronger or faster; sooner or later the person 
who wins is the person who thinks he can." Thanks Mom, 
Dad, Danny, Mikey & K.C. for being by my side thru the 
rough 4 years. You were not just a special teacher, but also a 
friend . Thanks Janis for helping me thru the last semester. 
Ken- it was fun hanging out. T's Pub Tues. & Wed. 
iughts*Karaoke night* 



J.T. Frucci 

Plymouth, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Thanks to: Mom, Dad, Matt, Tim, Mimi, Papa, 

Kristin, nate, Chris, and the nursing class of 1998- 

1 love you guys!! 




1 





Linda M. Kiessling 

West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

"BEHIND DIFFICULTY LIES OPPORTUNITY.' 



Elizabeth Ann Kilroy 

Foxboro, Massachusetts 

Visual Arts 



Brad Klimek 

Naples, Maine 
Management 





JoDY Lynn Koch 
m Hamden, Connecticut 

Nursing 
"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, 
today is a gift that is why it is called the present." 
Thanks Koch Klan and everyone else who made 
these years what they were. 



Nicole Stephanie Lapenta 
Avon, Connecticut 

Politics & History 
"The head learns new things, but the heart forever- 
more practices old experiences." - H.W. Beecher 
Four years J.c. I love you Mom & Dad. 



Jennifer B. Lawlor 

Yorktown Heights, New York 
Criminal ]ustice/Psychology 



W 



I 







Christopher George Lees 

West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
Communication 

I would like to thank the people who have made an impact 

on my life Mom & Dad-the greatest parents anyone can 

have. Ryan-keep following your dream. Pup, for being 
you*Bledsoe is the answer!* Alan Frank-thanks for every- 
thing. Ben, Matty & Buxton-Horsemen 4ever. Cronin, 
Dutch, Scottie, Walton, Uryga, & all the ladies. 
In memorium- James H. Lees 1915-1997 

Dorothy M. Connolly 1928-1993 

Thomas Lees 1950-1983 



David Christopher Legge 

Quincy, Massachusetts 

Communication/English 



James R. MacDonald 

Braintree, Massachusetts 
Communication 



Deirdre, I Love You. 
Broccoli Head. 



Good luck to Bachman the 






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Sara Elizabeth Kim MacGregor 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Communication/ Spanish 
Life lay ahead which path do I take. 
One to chose I'll not forsake. 
For I know not where I travel to, 
I wonder if I ever knew. 



Karen Marie MacKay 

Mansfield, Massachusetts 

Management 

I always knew I would look back at the bad times 

and laugh, but I never knew I would look back at 

the good times and cry. 



John Mahoney 

Ocean Bluff, Massachusetts 

Management 

"Happiness isn't just around thecorner.... Happiness 

is the corner." - BMW 







Michelle J. Maiocca 

Newtonville, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice/Psychology 



RoNi Malca 

Mexico City, Mexico 

Management 



Louis John Marani 

Marshf ield, Massachusetts 
Management 




Eric Stephen Marshall 

Newburyport, Massachusetts 
Sociology /Criminal Justice 
rhank you to my family. Thanks Brotherhood, 
[ohn & Keith, and all other friends. Good Luck & 
3od Bless. 



Kristen McDonough 

Milton, Massachusetts 
English 



James E. McGovern 

Milton, Massachusetts 

Management 

Thanks to: LM, BS, TA, JC, JF, JI, LP, JS, JM, MB, KS, 

CB, CH, MC, MM, PR, &TC. Love You Mom, Dad, 

Ellen & Sean. 



i 



\ 







Jason W. Morin 

Foxboro, Massachusetts 

Communication 

Thanks JT, LD, KW, AB, Mom, Dad, Grandma, 

Nancy, William F. Croak R.I.P., »PEACE TO ALL 

J SKEG! 



JuLiANNE Murphy 

Hanover, Massachusetts 

Nursing/Psychology 



Daniel J. O'Brien 

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 
English 




Marie O'Connell 

Norwood, Massachusetts 
Sociology 






Jessica Obispo 

Revere, Massachusetts 
Psychology /Nursing/Sociology 

Mom & Dad- thanks for your love and support, i 
love you both. Para mi abuela gracias por tu carino 
y tu bendicion. Pam, the sister I never had, thanks 
for being there through it all. To my special friends: 
Dawn, Gail & C.F.- thanks for your love. To P.S. 
"All my life," and then some.... To all, this Boricua 
did make it. 1 love you all, thanks. 



Rachel A. Ostrander 

Stoughton, Massachusetts 
Management 



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Elliot G. Perkins 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Management 



Tara M. Peterson 

Randolph, Massachusetts 
Nursing/Women's Studies 



Jared Pickering 

Middleboro, Massachusetts 
Psychology 



, Thanks Ma, Dad and Pat. 









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Lynne Piepiora Christine Linda Placidi 

Brockton, Massachusetts Needham, Massachusetts 

Management Nursing 

Mom & Dad, thanks for all your love and support. To my family, thanks for your love and support. 1 
KF,JM,LM,BS&EP- thanks for all the laughs. You Love You! Girls- Looks like we made it! Gobble, 
guys are the best! Gobble, Gobble. Which way did he go? Florida- Lloyd 

Road trips. Europe here we come! 



Susan M. Porcello 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Management I Accounting 

A special thanks to my family- Mom and Dad, Paul, 
Kim, Judy, and my two nieces-Nicole and Kristen. 
To my friends, new and old, good luck in the future. 
Mike- thank you for being there- hugs and kisses. 



S**' 

-© 




Raymond M. Reimold 

Hingham, Massachusetts 
Environmental Science 

Dad & Mom, thanks for ALL the support along the way. I couldn't 
have done it without you both. Gram, Kat, & Liz-appreciation for 
always being there encouraging me. Special thanks to Smitty, who 
spent countless hours helping me in all aspects along the way. Ten 
thousand thanks to: Dr. Chuck Towle for being such a great mentor 
to me in college & in life; Jarred, Seth, John, Jeff & Reynolds-my 
close friends; The Hornstra Family; Curry Staff & Honors Program 
for all the lessons learned; Thomas Auto Body; Ford Motor Com- 
pany; Farrell Auto; Duo Contracting; HHS; BA; FIB; FMC; & HOP. 
Thanks to the Stars Drinking Crew for being my stress relivers. To 
the rest, THANKS. 



Amy J. Rogers 

Taunton, Massachusetts 

Psychology /Elementary Education 

Goodbye all!! Mom and Gram- Thank you & Luv 

Ya's. Everyone who helped thanks. "Stalking" and 

"Palm trees." To be a great teacher. 



Adam Jay Rothenberg 

Roslyn Heights, New York 

Communication 

Thank you to my family and friends for all their < 

love and support over the years. 

"Happiness lies in your own hands." 

-Madonna 




Maria Elena Rowan 
Brockton, Massachusetts 
Communication/Public Relations 
"You never really leave a place you love. Part of it 
you take with you, leaving a part of yourself be- 
hind." Mom and Dad- without you 1 would have 
few accomplishments. 



Karl Rudolph 

Carmel, New York 

Management 
Mom & Dad- Thanks for everything. 
LD- The sis I never wanted. AL- My Sex Kitten. 
KS- Late night calls. Milton Hall- 150000 cal. 



S^ 






Melissa Rutman 

North Brunswick, New Jersey 
Management /Applied Computing 

"The best things come to those who wait." 
To my wonderful parents, 1 thank you for all of the • 
support and encouragement you have always given 
me. I love you both very much. Matthew, Staci, & 
Heather- thank you for all of your confidence. I 
love you. And to all of my friends & everyone that 
has stuck by me for the past five years. Thanks for 
everything, I Love You All! 




Marie Saint-Louis 

Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

Nursing 



Joseph H. Sargent 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Management 



Kerri Anne Saunders 

Milton, Massachusetts 

Communication 




Kenneth H. Sears 

Carshsle, Massachusetts 
Psychology 



Karen Ann Sheehan 

Flushing, New York 

Communication/English 



Keith Allen Shepard 

Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Criminal Justice 

"The truth shall set you free!" 

To the Brotherhood Bateman + Marshall. 

To Bates, for keeping the faith. Thar\ks to my 

family. 



s 



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Majorie Sterling Shirley 

Dallas, Texas 

Psychology /Preschool Education 

All of my hard work has paid of f! I thank my family 
& love all of you! 1 will miss my friends but will 
never forget ya'U. 



Mariann Smith 

Charlestown, Massachusetts 
Commwtication 
Family and friends- Thanks for being there. SS, NA, 
+ MA- No clue what 1 would do without you guys. 
BCN Crew- Thanks for the experience and Good 
Time Curry friends. I'll miss you. Good Luck. 



Maura Catherine Stapleton 

Norwood, Massachusetts 
Health Ediication/Biology&Psychology 
Thanks Mom, Dad, Ann, Joe, Don and Ken. I 
couldn't have made it without you guys. I will 
treasure all my Curry memories with all my friends. 
Thanks Pete for always being there. Good Luck 
Class of '98. 




Catherine Courtney Sullivan 
Boca Raton, Florida 

Sociology 



Deidre Ann Suter 

Emerson, New Jersey 

Management/Dance 



Adrienne Leigh Tierney 

Canton, Massachusetts , 

Communication I 

Softball #5 CCC Champs -BW Thanks- 
JC stairs and talks- BH secrets and drinking- 
Dad & Mom, thank you both for your love and 
support. I love you! 






LORI TOMASE 

Raynham, Massachusetts 

Psychology /Education 

hank you Mom, Dad, Jen, and Guy. I Love You. 




John Tranghese 

East Long Meadow, Massachusetts 
Management I Marketing 
Thanks Mom, Dad, and Tony. Good luck to all my 
friends and thanks for everything. 



James W, Vasoll 

Gardiner, Maine 

Management/English 
Hockey (94) Football (94) SGA (94-98) RA (95-98) 
Thanks to everyone for a great four years. Thank 
you Mom & Dad. Thank you SRD for everything. 
Joyce, could not have done it vsrithout you. 




Peter J. Votto 

North Haven, Connecticut 

Management /Applied Computing 
Thanks Dad, Lisa, and Steve- I couldn't have done 
it without you. Thanks to all my friends, especially 
Maura. Good Luck in the future. This has been the 
best four years!! 



Richard F. Walsh III 

Garden City, New York 

Communication 
Thank you to all the teachers that helped get me 
here. Most importantly, Pat M. Love you Mom, 
Dad, and family. Your the best Deb. 



Marci S. Wasserstrom 

Columbus, Ohio 

Communication/Public Relations 

"The best things in life are the simplest of 

pleasures." 



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Denise E. Watson 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Psychology 

A.A.+ B.A. 93, 98. Thanks to Curry for the money 
we'll make! Psychology /Special Education. Thanks 
to my Family and Miles. My success is ahead! 
C-Ya! 



Russell M. Webber 

Needham, Massachusetts 
Psychology 



Jonathan M. Wolsky 

New Rochelle, New York 
Management 




David Michael Yescott 

Unionville, Connecticut 

Communication 



Sara Zambrano 

Tarrytown, New York 
Education 



Kelly O'Dette 

Watertown, Massachusetts 

Nursing 



1-4"-' 






/\- 



Graduates Not Pictured 



Stephanie Ann Abdel-Aziz 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Joanne Antonitis 

Plain ville, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Pedro Santos Araujo 
Stoughton, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Jon David Austin 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Visual Arts 

Maureen Bligh 
Milton, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Denise Claffey 
Bedford, Massachusetts 
Nursing/Psychology 

Mary Elizabeth Coska 
Milton, Massachusetts 
Environmental Science 

Teresa Cristiani 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice 

Amy Lynn Crowe 
Holbrook, Massachusetts 
Nursing/Women's Studies 

John W. Curley 
Marshfield, Massachusetts 
English 



DanielleA. Dahlstedt 
Brookline, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Frances Daley-Gannon 
Duxbury Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Vasiliki Delkouras 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Heather J. Dempsey 

West Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

April DiBona 
Hanover, Massachusetts 
Biology 

ErikaA. Doebeli 

North Easton, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Donna Woods Doucette 
Braintree, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Jonathan E. Downs 
Den ville. New Jersey 
English 

Clifford Ducheine 
Milton, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice 

Jamie P. Duquette 
Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice 



Aaron W. Eastman 
Gloucester, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice 

Carl Easton 

Lexington, Massachusetts 

Politics&History 

Richard M. Fernando 
West Orange, New Jersey 
Visual Arts 

Joseph C. Ferrandi 
Danvers, Massachusetts 
Management 

Henry J. Floyd 
Brooklyn, New York 
Criminal Justice 

Keith A. Garland 
Hingham, Massachusetts 
Environmental Science 

DeAnna T. Grassi 

South Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Nursing 

Edmund T. Hagerty 
Holbrook, Massachusetts 
Management 

Elizabeth Ann Holland 
Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Duane Clifford Holrnes 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice 
Psychology & Politics & History 



whiles 



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^ 



Graduates Not Pictured 



Thomas A. Holton 

East Hartford, Connecticut 

Criminal Justice / Politics&History 

Jodi Anne Horton 
Foxboro, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Peter Francis Killion 

East Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Management 

Nealy E. Koumanelis 

South Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Visual Arts / Psychology 

Tricia Larivee 
Taunton, Massachusetts 
Education 

Edward Little 
Braintree, Massachusetts 
Communication 

Debra M. Lorenzo 
Foxboro, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Sydney E. Lowe 
Norwood, Massachusetts 
Communication 

Laury Lundy 
Mattapan, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

MeganJ. Malley 
Fairview Park, Ohio 
VisualArts 

Christopher M. Mazzone 
Littleton, Massachusetts 
Psychology 
History 



Joseph J. McClory 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
Management 

Paul J. McConville 
Braintree, Massachusetts 
Management 

Joseph M. McDonagh 
Milton, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Kelly Ann McGee 
Lynnfield, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Maryellen McGrath 
Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Psychology /Visual Arts 

Charles E. McKinnies 
Holbrook, Massachusetts 
Management 

Jessica A. Mecca 
Washington, Maine 
English/Management 

Alicia M. Morley 
Braintree, Massachusetts 
Education/ Psychology 

Warren M. Nagler 
Flushing, New York 
Politics&History 

Eleanor M. Nee 
Stoughton, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Justin C. Nickerson 
Foxboro, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice / Politics 



Pauline E. Nwokeforo 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Jennifer B. Oliveira 
Rumford, Rhode Island 
Psychology 

MarkA. Onderdonk 
Westwood, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Jennifer C. Pacheco 
Sudbury, Massachusetts 
Psychology 

Sunni C. Powers 
Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Peter H. Reichborn 
Greenwich, Connecticut 
Management 

Charles E. Roderick 
Newport, Rhode Island 
Psychology / English 

Mark T. Rugaber 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Politics&History 

Alison Schultz 
Milton, Massachusetts 
Sociology 

Atsushi Sonoi 
Tokyo, Japan 
Management 

Paul-Michael Soriano 
Livingston, New Jersey 
Psychology /Sociology 






J 



Graduates Not Pictured 



Brenda M. Sullivan 
Hull, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Cheryl Sullivan 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice 

Lisa M. Trombini 
Needham, Massachusetts 
Nursing /Psychology 

Caleb Ultimo 
Brockton, Massachusetts 
Biology 

Fernando R. Valiente 

Garden Hills Guaynab, Puerto Rico 

Communication 

Christine Milne Watson 
Kingston, Massachusetts 
Nursing ' 



Denise M. Williams 
Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Nursing/Dance 

Michael E. Wood 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
Management 

Michael Jude Wynant 
Carver, Massachusetts 
Nursing 

Caleb S. Wyse 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Communication 




\)-^ 

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Curry College 



one 



hundred nineteenth 



Commencement 



Sunday, May the seventeenth 

nineteen hundCred and ninety-eight 

10:00 a.m. 

Jlcademic Quadrangfe 
MiCton, Massachusetts 



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Awards Night 



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W. George Kennedy Memorial Scholarship 

Sabrina Dube and 

Dean of Student AffairsBob Fink 



Ethel Trafton Nursing Award 
Claire Maranda and Macy Hussey 



First Prize for Non-Fiction 

Arts Journal Award 
Ed Meek and David Legge 




Health Education Award 
Linda Jarvis-Randal and Daniqua Hamilton 



Science Award 
Ray Reimold and Prof. Malene Samuelson 



Colonel Pride-Athlete Award 

Anthony Caruso and 

Athletic Director Pam Samuelson 






''/v. 



Awards Night 




Student Choice Award 
Peter Hallen and SGA President Jamie Vasoll 



Scholar-Athlete of the Year Award 

Adrienne Tierney and 
Athletic Director Pam Samuelson 



PAL Scholarship 
Chad Perry and PAL Director Lisa Ijiri 




Outstanding Senior in Broadcasting Award 
Jeff Buxton and Roberta Kosberg 



Alexander Graham Bell Honor Society (Juniors) 



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Awards Night 




Class of 1998 Recognition Award 
Joyce Sangrey 




Who's Who 
Juniors & Seniors 



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Awards Night 




Recognition of Teaching Cohort 

Prof. Ernie Silver, Brian Castellano, Dan Eusebio (Sodexho), Cheryl Barrett. 

Not Pictured: Pete Votto, John Mahoney, & Craig Holz 



I 




Theatre Arts Award: Curry Theater Hall of Fame 
Marci Wasserstam and Michael Salzman 



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IS 









Ryan Foshay Hanson 

In the words of a very special 
person "Good luck in the past" 
and avoid "back lapping" in 
the future. Your success is a 
constant joy to us. 
Love, 
Dad, Mom, Shad-O, Annie 
and Sage 



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TULATIONS 




Congratulations 
Curt & the Curry 
class of 1998! 
Continue to 
nnove onward 
& upward, 
and may your 
sails always 
be full! 



Love, Mom, Dad, Kitty, Jean, Da 



and Ben 





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Kelly O'Dette 

YxWy, Congratulations, all of your hard work has 
paid off and you made your dream come true. We 
are very proud of you. 
Love, Mom, Dad, Katie & Matthew 





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Karl Rudolph 

Congratulations! May all 

your future dreams and goals 

come true. 

We love you. 

Mom, Dad, Kurt and Daniel 



Lauren J. Domingos 

Lauren, 

"We just can't imagine that you've ever been gone - 
it's not starting over it's just going on . . ." You 
have brought so much joy to our family. You will 
enjoy success in all you do; love and understanding 
to everyone you meet. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Richie, Caryn and 

Kermit the Frog 






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JAMES WILLIAMS VASOLL 

You have heeen special to us since 
the day you were horn. Congratula- 
tions on all your accomplishments 
and may your future he filled iwth 
happiness and success. 

]Ne are so proud of you . 

Love, 

Mom & Dad 
Champ & Gladys 





Peter Votto 



Peter, 



Best Wishes for a job well done! I 
]Nere all very proud of you! 

Steve, Lisa, Dad, All the Family 
and your Friends at work. 

We Love You!! 



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Dear Brian, your first day of school seems like yesterday. 
You have accomplished so much these past four years. 
Be proud of yourself, we all are. We wish you much 
happiness, and success in whatever you may do. 
Love, Mom, Dad, and Brett 


Lisa, Steve & kids. 




1 





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James Gay 






Congratidations! Jim. 
We are so proud of you and 
all your accomplishments! 
May you reach all your goals 
and your dreams become a 






reality. 
Love, 






Dad, Mom, and David 







Eric Marshall 

We want to congratulate you on your 
graduation from Curry and let you know 
how very proud we are of you for all your 
accomplishments. Most of all we are so very 
proud of you for the person you are. 

Love, 
Mom, Dad & Pete 








"Hot Dogs and French Fries" 



"Dressed to Impress" 



Nicole Lapenta 

Congratulations Nick! 

Four years, it seems like yesterday. 

We are very proud of your hard work, perserverence and 

accomplishment! 

All our Love! 

Mom, Dad, Kate and Mike 

P.S.: Congratulations to you too, Jenn! 



W^ 



..-h-O^ 




Peter Campbell 

Peter: 

Congratulations! 

You did it! 

You have the Wisdom, the Courage, 

the Experience and now the formal 

Tools to LEAP into life with the 

same unbridled exuberance you've 

always shown. 

We're VERY proud of you! 

With Love and Admiration, 

Mom, Dad, Anne, Buck, 

Ryan & Amanda 




Sterling Shirley 



Thank you for your many 
gifts. Your life has been an 
inspiring message of love 
and courage for each of us 



Congratulations 

Mom, Peyton, Sarah & Pascal 



^hs7j 









Megan J. Malley 

Best wishes and continued success. 

Lots of Love, 

Mom & Dad, Mike & Angela, Bee, Rachel, Dan, Mellissa, 

Sis, Jared, Packy 





Ariana M. Afnan 



Ari, 



We wish you good friends, good 
fortune, and good health. Stay as 
sweet and kind as you are today. 
Your smile is your magnet. 

We love you! 
Mom and Dad 




Brian Scott Gambardella 

Dear Brian, 

You are one of the hardest 
working individuals we know. You 
have proven that obstacles are not a 
means of holding one hack. Always 
reach for the stars. With your self 
determination nothing will be im- 
possible for you to achieve. We 
love you. 

Mom, Dad, Dee & Cassie 



\ 



s 



:xi^ 






^ 




Stephen Armaly 

We are so proud of you! 

What a great joy to watch your dreams become realities. 
Keep up the good work and nver lose sight of your goals. 
Congratulations! 

We love you, 

Mom, Dad, and Mary Ellen 




Malik Kibwe Brown 

Malik, we are very proud that you have chosen to 

succeed! 

Via con Dios! 

Love, Mom, Dad and Grandma 




Sara E. K. MacGregor 

Dear Sara, We're so glad that you are part of your 
family! Congratulations on all of your accomplishments 
and for being such a caring daughter and friend. All of 
our love to you always! Mom and Dad 



A- 




li'-S ^ 


I^HIi 


mW Jfe* 


1 1 




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Harshene Kamall Cunningham 

Harshene, Truly you are a blessing, CoJigratulations! ! ! 
You have given us many proud memories. Remember 
to follow your dreams and put God First. 
Peace be with you. Our Love, Mom Dad & facob. 




Keith Shepard 

Congratulations! 

]Ne are so very proud of you 

and know how hard you have 

worked. Best of luck and 

happiness. 

We love you. 
Mom, Dad & Kim 




RAY REIMOLD 

Your early experiments with 
water & soil have led to 
successes we could never have 
imagined. We're very proud 
of you. 

triotn, aljaa, oLizz, ^J\at, Kjrum 



\ 



S,r 



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(i-^J 






Jennifer Calardo 

Both the Colonel and I agree you're our favorite M.V.P. 




Dad, Arlene, Chris, Kurt, Grandma and Aunt Mary Lou. 




Adam Rothenberg 

Dear Adam, We are very proud of you and of your 
many achievements. We love you very much. 
Mom, Dad & Scott 




John Bateman 

Congratulations, we are so proud. Keep reaching for 

your dreams. 

Love, Ma Dad & Paid 




Tracy Hatch 

Congratulations! Reach for the Stars, and you can help 
change this world. Tracy, I'm so proud, I love you. 
G.B. Mom 
RD+M, MD, D+f, A, J+2, D, B+C 




Melissa Rutman 

Dear Melissa, 
Congratulations on all of 
your accomplishments. We 
are so proud of you. May 
you have success and 
happiness in all of your 
future endeavors. 
With all our love. 
Mom Dad, Matt, Staci and 
Heather. 



Eric Marshall 

Congratulations for your accomplishments. 
Joan Brooks 









Fernando Valiente 



You did a great job! 




■"'»^- 






Go into the world with pride and assurance 
Que Dios te bendiga! 
Pai y Mami 






MiCHELE Douglas 

Mish, 

This is our proudest moment! 
We always knew you could do it. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, & Amy 







'^»^, 




l^g^ 






Good Lu(W& Bet 



■*1P^ 





Agence France-Presse 



NG SEH5 INPE' 



9.89' 



i143e 




(^: A 15-day school strike in Ontario, 
Canada, affects 2.1 million 
students. Late in October, 
128,000 teachers wall! out to 
protest a controversial bill that 
would alter educational funding 
and centralize government 
control of education. 






0^ Governments and businesses 
worldwide race to remedy the 
"Year 2000" problem. Unless 
key computer systems are 
reprogrammed to recognize dates 
in the new century the world faces 
the threat of catastrophic failure 
in critical areas like banking, air 
safety, public utilities and defense. 



Asian economic turmoil triggers 
global unrest. In October, Hong 
Kong's stock market crashes. Asian 
countries receive billions in bailout 
dollars from the International 
Monetary Fund. 





,'X Hong Kong reverts to China at 12:01 a.m., July 1, 
after 156 years of British colonial rule. China says 
Hong Kong will continue its Western way of life 
and free-market economy. 



Reutera/Archive Pliotos 




Montserrat, once called 
"the Emerald Isle of the 
Caribbean," is devastated 
by ongoing eruptions 
from a volcano that had 
been dormant for 400 
years. TVo-thirds of the 
populace evacuates. 




z^. Powerful earthquakes in central 
Italy kill 1 1 people and damage 
art treasures, including centuries-old 
frescoes by Italian Renaissance 
painters, in the Basilica of St. Francis 
ofAssisi. 



(Ilk 




I The remains of Ernesto "Che" 
Guevara, martyred Marxist 
revolutionary, are laid to rest in 
Cuba in October, 30 years after 
his execution in Bolivia, where his 
bones recently had been found. 



After 32 years of autocratic rule. 
President Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire 
is deposed in May 1997 and later dies 
in exile. His successor, Laurent 
Kabila, changes Zaire's name to 
Democratic Republic of the Congo. 



Change sweeps Great Britain as 
Labor Party leader Tony Blair's 
landslide election in May 1997 
ousts the Conservatives and makes 
Blair, at 44, Britain's youngest 
prime minister bi 185 years. 

Hunicane Pauline slams into 
Mexico's Pacific coast in October, 
causing flash floods, landslides 
and at least 200 fatalities. 
The resort city of Acapuico is 
heavily damaged. 




Halloween fever seizes France. 
At the base of the Eiffel Tower 
in Paris 8,000 pumpkins are 
displayed, and French children 
participate in an American-style 
Halloween celebration. 



I President Jiang Zemin of China meets for summit talks witli 
President Bill Clinton in October, the first visit in 12 years of 
a Chinese leader to the U.S. During his stay, demonstrators 
protest China's treatment of Tibet. 



Diana, Princess of Wales, one of 
llie world's most famous and 
admired women, dies at 36 in a 
violent car crash in Paris on 
August 31. 





One of the most poignant images of Dima's funeral: her young sons 
following her coffin into Westminster Mbej 



Crisis flares again in Iraq in 
late 1997 as Saddam Hussein 
protests U.N. sanctions 
and blacks inspection of 
suspected Iraqi weapon sites. 



Reuters/Archive Photos 



Floods, drougM and 
mtsnuHMgemcfit in North Korea 
create a wveie famine. As many 
a% a miNian North Koreans die 
of starvation. 

Pope Mm Paul li»Wts< 
CuIm bi January 1998, the < 
time a pope has done so. 
Ms fhrenlay visit the pope 
celebrates pulilic masses and 
meets privatety wMi Prasident 
iFidei Castro. 





In June, shortly before Diana's death, an auction 
of 79 of her evening govms raises $3.26 million 
for AIDS and cancer charities. Top price paid for 
a single gown: $222,500. 



i>3WS 



World 



aiMa 



Brooks Kraft. Sygma 




I On July 23 suspected murderer 
Andrew Cunanan, 27, commits suicide 
in Miami Beacli. Cunanan was the 
prime suspect in a cross-country killing 
spree that left five dead, including 
fashion designer Gianni Versace. 




Once-mighty Apple Computer is 
close to failure when arch-rival 
Bill Gates of Microsoft "rescues" 
it with a $150 million bail-out in 
August. The event opens a new 
era of cooperation between 
formerly fierce competitors. 




In April 1997, floods ravage the entire Red River 
Valley between Minnesota and the Dakotas. 
Ninety percent of downtown Grand Forks, North 
Dakota, is underwater. 




k Americans join 
"Stop the Violence" 
campaigns nationwide 
in an attempt to generate 
awareness of and solutions 
to the problem of violence 
in America. 




Jonattlari Elderfleld. Cammatiaison 



Joe Camel is snuffed out as the 
Federal TVade Commission bans 
tobacco advertising aimed at minors 
and institutes sweeping tobacco 
advertising restrictions. 



flask 





British nanny Louise Woodward, 19, 
is convicted in Massachusetts of 
murdering a child in her care. 
The judge later reduces the charge 
to involuntary manslaughter and 
releases her. 



Timothy McVeigh is convicted of 
murder and conspiracy in June for 
the April 1995 bombing of the Alfred 
P Murrah Federal Building in 
Oklahoma City. McVeigh is later 
sentenced to death. 



Theodore Kaczynski admits he is 
the Unabomber responsible for 
idlling 3 people and injuring 29 
others in an 18-year bombing 
campaign. His January 1998 guilty 
plea spares Kac^nski the death 
penalty but condemns him to 
life in prison with no possibility 
of release. 

UPS woriiers take to the picket 
lines in an August strike lasting 
15 days. The eventual settlement 
is seen as a major labor victoiy. 




First Lt. Kelly Flinn accepts a general 
discharge from the Air Force, avoiding 
court-martial for lying about an affair 
and disobeying orders. Flinn had been 
the first and only female B-52 pilot in 
the service. 



Artliur Harvey, The Miami Herald 



f< ('liters/Archive Piiotos 



A rare urban tornado prowls 
through Miami on May 12, 
uprooting trees, shattering 
windows and snapping 
power lines. Fortunately, 
the storm inflicts only 
minor injuries. 




Attorney General Janet Reno refuses to name an independent 
prosecutor to investigate Clinton administration fundraising, causing 
friction with FBI Director Louis Freeh. 




Bobbi McCaughey, Carlisle, Iowa, 
gives birth November 19 to seven 
babies, the U.S.'s first living 
septuplets. McCaughey and 
her husband Kenny now have 
eight children. 



Reulers/Afcliive Piiolos 



I Terry Nichols is found guilty of 
conspiracy and manslaughter in 
the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. 
Nichols is spared a federal death 
sentence in January 1998, but still 
faces Oklahoma state charges. 



©Rictiarti Ellis, Sygma 



UFO enthusiasts 
gather in Roswell, 
New Mexico, to 
celebrate the 50th 
anniversary of the 
alleged UFO crash 
there in July 1947. 






At the InterneiyOnline Summit 
in December, Vice President 
Al Gore announces government 
initiatives to protect young internet 
users from online pornography 



nasi) 



Fast-food giant Burger King is forced to stop serving burgers 
when supplier Hudson Foods recalls 25 million pounds of 
hamburger suspected of contamination with £ coli bacteria. 
It is the biggest beef recall in U.S. history 



The alknale Promise Keepers 
movement inspires praise and 
controversy for its mess^ie of 
spiritual revival and personal 
responsibilHy for men. In October, 
the group holds a giant rally in 
Washington, D.C. 

Once-secret tape recordings of 
former presidents Kennedy and 
Nixon are released publicly. The 
tapes provide an unvarnished, and 
sometimes unflattering, glimpse 
into the two presidents' actions and 
conversations in the White House. 




I On October 25, at least 300,000 
African-American women gather in 
Philadelphia for the Million Woman 
March. Winnie Madikizela-Mandela 
is one of the speakers, i 



Mional 







Viewers worldwide see the first-ever 
high-resolution color pictures of 
Mars when the Pathfinder spacecraft 
lands July 4. The lander and its rover, 
Sojourner, collect and transmit 
extraordinary data for three months. 







I Russia's aging yi^(> space station 
collides with an unmanned supply 
vehicle in June and is seriously 
damaged. This is only one in a 
series of crises casting doubt on 
the viability of the station. 




For $8.36 million, Chicago's Field Museum of Natural 
History buys "Sue," the most complete Tyramosaurm 
rex fossil yet discovered. The sale occurs October 4 
at Sotheby's in New York. \ 




Reulers/Arctih'e Photos 




) Research produces medical break- 
throughs, including a genetically 
engineered "bullet" molecule being 
tested to fight cancer and new 
drugs to control or prevent 
Parkinson's disease, osteoporosis 
and congestive heart failure. 



The popular diet regimen fen-phen is 
pulled off the market in September 
The combination of fenfiuramine and 
phentermine is shown to cause heart 
valve disorders, as is the diet drug 
Redux, also recalled. 



I In September, CAT scans 
of petrified dinosaur eggs 
found in China reveal a 
dinosaur embryo. 




Reuters/Archive Photos 



Scottish scientists in February 1997 
announce the world's first cloning of 
an adult mammal. The sheep, named 
Dolly, fuels controversy over possible 
misuse of the technology 



fUsI) 



Fuel cells that convert a fuel's 
eneigy directly into electricity are 
being developed for use in cars, 
making possible an efficient, 
low-emission car of the future. 

The first prescription pill fbr 
male-pattem baldness is 
approved by the Food and Dnig 
Administration in December. 
The dnig Propecia is made by 
Merck and Company. 




Aided by the Hubble Space 
Telescope, astronomers discover the 
Pistol Star — the brightest star yet 
observed in the Milky Way The Pistol 
Star is 25,000 light years from Earth. 



Comet Hale-Bopp 
captures imaginations 
worldwide as it streaits past 
Earth for the first time in 
4,200 years— or, since 2203 
B.C. Hale-Bopp next returns 
in 4397. 








:''Wj On October 13, the British jet car Thrust SSC becomes the first vehicle 
to breal< the sound barrier on land, traveling 766.6 miles per hour in the 
Nevada desert. 




El Niffo stirs up global weather 
patterns. Caused by warmer-than- 
normal water temperatures in the 
equatorial Pacific, the '97 El Nijio 
is blamed for storms and weather 
problems worldwide. 



In December, 159 nations 
gather in Kyoto, Japan, and 
negotiate a climate treaty 
to combat global warming by 
reducing greenhouse gases. 



Reuters/Archive Pholos 



The Food and Drug 
Administration 
approves a dental laser 
for treating cavities. 
Unlike traditional 
dental drills, the laser 
in most cases causes 
virtually no discomfort. 



Premier User Systems, Inc. 





flash 



Protesters unsuccessfully attempt 

to prevent the October launch of 

NASA's Cassini spacecraft to 

Saturn, fearing an accident could 

shower the Earth with the rocket's 

radioactive plutonium. 



> Riven, the 
long-awaited 
computer adventure 
game sequel to Myst, 
proves to be just as 
popular and even 
more sophisticated 
visually than its 
predecessor. 



Hong Kong authorities in 
December order tlie slaugltter of 
more tlian a million chicitens in an 
effort to iialt tlie spread of a bind 
flu vinis that killed six people. 

The space shuttle Columbia 
releases the errant Spartan 
satellite in November. U.S. 
astronaut Winston Scott and 
Takao Doi, the first Japanese 
astronaut to do a space walk, 
retrieve the satellite for return 




French oceanographer and 
award-winning filmmaker Jacques 
Cousteau dies in June at 87. His work 
gained renown through the popular 
television series 
"The Undersea World 
of Jacques Cousteau." 



Science 





Teen People, a savvy monthly magazine 
for and about teenagers, premieres in 
February 1998. 






Fasliion advertising and clothing trends inspire the 
popularit)' of the color orange, which replaces neon 
green as the fad color of the year. 



In October, a cyberfashion show at the M.l.T. Media Lab Wearable 
Symposium features fashions with built-in computer devices and 
electronic hardware. M.l.T. students designed the high-tech fashions. 



DIANA 




i Princess Diana tribute merchandise 
abounds, including a double CD 
set and a new Beanie Baby named 
Princess, a royal purple bear 
adorned with a rose. Profits 
benefit the Diana, Princess of Wales 
Memorial Fund. 




OSleve Cranilz. Relna 

Fashion looks to the Far East. The 
stick-on bindi, a tiny decorative 
accent worn in the middle of the 
forehead, is popularized by Gwen 
Stefani, lead singer of the band 
No Doubt. 




This year's look in 
cosmetics is glimmering, 
sparkling and colorful. 
Riding this wave, 
cosmetics giant Christian 
Dior introduces Mascara 
Flash, temporary hair 
color in a variety of 
outrageous tints. 




Platform shoes, a fashion statement 
during the disco '70s, make a style 
comeback in a big way in 1 997, 
inspiring even platform sneakers. 



Nike introduces a new "I Can" 
advertising campaign on New 
Year's Day. The company does not 
plan to abandon its "Just Do It" 
slogan, introduced in 1985, which 
will continue to appear on T-shirts 
and posters. 

Diet Scent Patches are introduced 
in June by Slimline, a British 
company. Designed to help people 
diet successhilly, the small arm 
stickers produce an unpleasant 
odor to discourage the wearer 
from eafing sweets. 




"TVo Fat Ladies" becomes the Food 
Network's hottest new cooking show 
in the U.S., attracting fans with its 
unconventional British stars, two 
overweight, middle-aged women. 



The Chevrolet Corvette 
is named Molor Trend 
magazine's 1998 Car of 
the Year. 





Softer Hairstyle -'-"^ 



Smaller Chest 

Larger Waist 
Smaller Hips — 



A new $50 bill featuring a larger, off-center portrait of President Ulysses S. Grant is 
unveiled in October. Design details make the bill more difficult to forge. 



Mattel introduces Share a Smile 
Becky in May 1997. Seated in a 
bright pink wheelchair, the doll is 
marketed as a friend to the 
traditional Barbie. 




After nearly 40 years, 
Mattel's Barbie doll 
takes on a more realistic 
face and body shape 
than the Barbie of the 
'60s. The new doll will 
begin to appear in 
stores in early 1998. 




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Mehndi, intricate 
designs painted on the 
body with henna dye, 
is a popular expression 
of the fashion trend 
toward Eastern themes 
and patterns. 



I Digital "pets" are a 1997 toy craze. These 
virtual critters keep their owners busy by 
beeping when they need care or feeding. 
If ignored, they "die." 



fUsk 



Popular board games 
appear on CD-ROM in 
ever-growing numbers, 
including interactive 
favorites Monopoly 
Scrabble, Sorry, Risk 
and Boggle. 



As many as 700 school disliicts 
nationwide teach "emotional 
MeHgence," anting to develop 
childmi^ values and people sKMs 
as wel as their mbids. 

JB mpbw are a status symbol and a 
[ ffestyle must-have for many teens 
juggBng school, jobs and 
after-school activilies. More than 
[40 nriKon beepers are carried 
|ta the U^., an estimated 25 
percent of them by people between 
ttie ages of 12 and 24. faisome 
schools, beepers are forbidden 
^ as disruptive. 




Canada issues a Superhero postage 
stamp series that includes a 45-cent 
stamp featuring the colorful, 
comic-book image of Superman. 



Lifestyle 



Mm 



ialnment 




> ; ABC's gritty police drama "IWD Blue" remains one of the most 
'' popular one-hour dramas on television in 1997, capturing four 
Emmy Awards. 



-i) The Lost World, Sl&ien 

'~'"' SpieVoet^'s Jurassic Park sequel, 
breaks summer box-office 
records everywhere. It earns 
$229 million in the U.S. 






Comedian Chris Farley dies at 33 of a drug overdose 
on December 18. He starred in NBC's "Saturday 
Night Live" and movies including Tommy Boy and 
Beuerty Hills Ninja. 



Columbia/Mandalay from the Kobal Collection 



Universal Studios, Inc., from Sliooling Star 




^ Jerry Seinfeld, creator 
and star of the NBC hit 
"Seinfeld," announces 
in December that the 1997- 
1998 season is the show's 
last. The final episode airs 
in May, ending the popular 
show's nine-year run. 




flaish 



:'^. Horror films draw teenagers to the 
- box office. I Know What You Did Last 
Summer, starring Jennifer Love Hewitt 
and Sarah Michelle Cellar, is one of 
the year's biggest attractions. 



Gino Mifsud, Shooting Star 




I Fox network launches "King of 
the Hill," an animated show that 
focuses on the lives of a propane 
dealer from Texas and his family. 
The show goes on to become a 
smash hit. 



Scream 2, the chilling hit sequel to 
Scream, is a wildly successful mbt 
of carnage and comedy starring 
Neve Campbell, Jerry O'Connell, 
Tori Spelling, Jada Pinkett and a host 
of other stars. 



In its second season, the WBIs 
campy sitcom "Buffy ttie Vampire 
Slayer" l)tossonis into a liuge 
favorite with many viewers. :. 



lenny IVIcCarthy stars in a new 
fall NBC comedy "lenny" that, 
in Januaiy 1998, goes into hiatus 
only a few months into its first 
season. McCarthy had been an 
nnv personality before moving to 
fhenetworic 




Critically acclaimed ,4m/sto(f, 
directed by Steven Spielberg, tells 
the story of an 1839 slave ship mutiny 
The film culminates years of effort by 
producer Debbie Allen to bring the 
story to life. 



CBS Enlerlaiiimenl (rom Shooting Star 



I Religion Is a common theme 
on elgiit fall-season network 
TV shows inspired by the 
success of CBS's "Touched 
by an Angel" starring Roma 
Downey, Delia Reese and 
John Dye. New programs 
include ABC's "Nothing 
Sacred" and "Teen Angel." 





Titanic is a huge critical and box-office success. The movie event of the 
year, this $200 million picture is the most costly in history After 45 days 
in the theaters, Titanic had earned $308 nfiillion. 




Michael Flatley's pulsating 
show "Lord of the Dance" 
fuels the extraordinary 
popularity of Irish dance. 
The show tours 15 cities in 
the U.S. through October. 




Star Wars captures a new generation of fans when 
George Lucas re-releases the film trilogy 20 years 
after the first film was shown. In Washington, D.C., 
the National Air and Space Museum mounts a huge 
exhibition of now-historic &flr Wars artifacts. 



In the fail, Fox debuts 
"Ally McBeal," a 
comedy/drama starring 
Calista Flockhart as a 
young Boston attorney 
The show captures a 
Golden Globe Award 
in January 1998 for best 
series/musical or comedy 




©Fox from Stiooling Star 




Matt Damon stars as an attorney 
in Tlie Rainmalter, a movie based 
on the John Grisham novel. 
Damon's successes also include 
the film Good Will Hunting. 



Summer blockbuster 
Men in Black grosses 
more than $500 million 
worldwide to become 
1997's biggest hit. 
The sci-fi comedy stars 
Will Smith and Tommy 
Lee Jones. 



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7Ae Wondetfttl Worid of Disney 
presents its adaptation of 
"Rodgers & Hammerstein's 
Cinderella" on ABC, staning 
Brandy as Cinderella and Whitney 
Houston as the Faiiy Godmother. 

Tomoimw Never Dies , starring 
Pierce Brosnan as 007, is a 
holiday box-office hit and 
confirms the enduring popularity 
of James Bond movies. 




The 1997 season premiere 
episode of "ER" is broadcast 
live and draws 42.7 million 
viewers for NBC, including 
those who watch it on a 
giant screen in Times Square. 



1^3 WS 



Entertainment 




I 



Chumbawamba's hit single 
"TVibthumping" brings long-awaited 
success to this British band. 
The song becomes popular at 
pro sports events, kicking off 
games for several teams. 




Rap artist the Notorious B.I.G. is killed in a 
March 1997 drive-by shooting in Los Angeles. 
He is posthumously awarded MTVs 1997 Best Rap 
Video Award for "Hypnotize" and is named Spin 
magazine's Artist of the Year. 



Fiona Apple, 20, one of rock's 
female superstars, is named 
MTVs Best New Artist in a Video. 
Her single "Criminal" soars to 
the top of the charts. 





With their hit single 
"MMMBop," three young 
brothers from 'I\ilsa 
become one of the 
biggest breakthrough 
acts of 1997 as the 
band Hanson. 



Blakesberg, Retna 



Lilith Fair, an all-female summer rock 
concert, draws large crowds on its 
37-stop tour. Canadian singer-songwriter 
Sarah McLachlan masterminds the festival 
and releases a hit album, 5'ur/i2C/ftg. 



*; 
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ftk Country music superstar 

Garth Brooks releases Sevens, 
his first album in two years. 
The album sells 800,000 copies 
the first week. 



Walk This Way: The Autobiography 
ofAemsmith chronicles the long 
career of the band notorious for its 
excesses in the '70s and '80s. The 
group's new album Nine Lives is 
nominated for a 1998 Grammy . 




^ Smash Mouth popularizes a genre 
" of alternative rock known as neo-ska 
with its hit single "Walkin' on the Sun" 
and debut album fusA Yu Mang. 



British pop phenomenon, 
the Spice Girls, mal<es 
millions with mega-hits 
such as "Wannabe" and sells 
14 million albums and 
10 million singles. 



Ron Davis, Shooling Star 








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I Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys engineers the second Tibetan 
Freedom Concert, held in June in New York, offering 27 music acts 
and a free-Tibet political message. 





Third Eye Blind, after several 
years in San Francisco's 
underground music scene, 
goes big time in 1997. Their 
song "Semi-Charmed Life" is 
listed as the top-selling 
modern rock single for 1997 
in Billboard magazine. 



I The album No Waf Out by Puff 
Daddy & the Family goes 
multiplatinum. Pufly's single 
"I'll Be Missing You," an elegy 
to his friend the Notorious B.I.G., 
also tops the charts. 



©sieve Jennings. Corbis 



Sbdeen-year-old R&B 
phenom Jonny Lang 
opens for the Rolling 
Stones' fall tour and 
spends 16 weeks at 
No. 1 on Billboard's 
blues chart with his 
album ire to Ms. 





Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds, superstar 
producer songwriter singer, receives more 1998 
Grammy nominations than any other artist, including 
one for his album The Day. Edmonds and wife 
Tracey also produce the iWmSoulFood in 1997. 



(Metallica releases a seventh album, 
Re-Load, that confinns its position 
as the premier heavy-metal band in 
the music world. 

Radiohead is Spin magazine's Band 
of the Year. Critics praise 
Radiohead's album OK Computer, 
variously described as haunting, 
revolting, inscrutable, stunning 
andgoi^eous. Hie album receives 
a 1998 Grammy nomination for 
Rock/Pop Album of the Year. 



At 15, country music sensation 
LeAnn Rimes sells more than 12.5 
million recordings in the U.S. in 
1 997 and is named Billboard Music 
Awards Artist of the Year. Her single 
"How Do 1 Live" is one of the year's 
best sellers. 





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In July, 16-year-old Swiss tennis star 
Martina Hingis becomes the youngest 
Wimbledon champion since 1887. 
Hingis wins three of the four 1997 
Grand Slam events. 




Quarterback John Elway leads 
the Denver Broncos to a 31-24 
victory over the Green Bay 
Packers in Super Bowl XXXil in 
San Diego, January 25, 1998. It is 
Elway's first Super Bowl win in 
four appearances. 




The Florida Marlins are baseball's 1997 World Series 
champs and the first team ever to win the Series 
without winning its league pennant. The Marlins 
defeat the Cleveland Indians in seven games. 




i Tiger Woods, 21, becomes 
the youngest golfer ever to 
win the Masters Tournament. 
His 18-under-par score sets 
a Masters record. Woods 
wins 3 other tournaments 
and sets a PGA Tour earnings 
record of $2.1 million for 
the season. 




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Pittsburgh Penguins' Mario 
Lemieux retires in April 1997 after 
a spectacular comeback from 
Hodgkin's disease and injury. 
Lemieux is elected to the Hockey 
Hall of Fame in September. 



In April 1997, the premier issue of 
Sports Illustrated Women hits 
the newsstands. The magazine 
reflects the explosive growth of 
female participation in sports. 



Swedish golfing phenomenon 
Annilo Sorenstam, 26, tops the 
LPGA earnings list in 1997 with a 
i«cord $1,236,789. 

Professional sports salaries keep 
sl^racketing. One of the most 
publicized of 1997 is Kevin 
Gamett^ $126 million conbBct to 
play basketball for the Minnesota 
Timbeiwolves. 



I Mike Tyson bites off part of Evander 
Holyfield's ear and is disqualified in 
the WBA Heavyweight rematch in June 
1997. Tyson is fined nearly $3 million 
and his boxing license is revoked. 



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I Charles Woodson, Michigan's versatile 
junior cornerback, becomes the first 
primarily defensive player to win the 
Heisman Ti-ophy awarded in December. 



©CraiR Jones, Allsporl 



I Jeff Gordon, at 26, wins the 
1997 NASCAR Winston Cup, his 
second Wjnston Cup point title 
in three years. Gordon's 1997 
points total4,710. 




Scoll CiinnlnRliafri, NflA/AIKpofl 




Nagano, J^pan, hosts the 1998 
Winter Olympic Games during 
February. Three new medal 
sports make their Olympic debut: 
curling, snowboarding and 
women's ice hockey. 



I The Chicago Bulls 
beat the Utah Jazz 
in June 1997 for 
their fifth NBA 
championship in 
seven years. Michael 
Jordan is chosen 
Finals MVP a record 
fifth time. 



When the college football 
season ends, two teams 
share the national 
championship. Michigan (12-0) 
is named No. 1 by the sports 
writers' poll, and Nebraska 
(13-0) by the coaches' poll. 




©Doug Densinger. Allsporl 




Detroit Red Wings captain 
Steve Yzerman powers his 
team to the 1997 Stanley 
Cup championship, its first 
in 42 years, by sweeping 
the Philadelphia Flyers in 
four games. 




fieuIers/Arch'^e Photos 



In its debut season, the 
WNBA exceeds all league 
expectations for success. 
The Houston Comets' 
championship win rf' 
over the New ^yh 
York Liberty caps ^i 
the 1997 season. 



Women officiate in an all-male 
professional sports league for 
the first time. The pioneers, 
Dee Kanter and Violet Palmer, 
are referees in the NBA. 



Mailt McGwire, of the St Louis 
Cardinals, slams 52 homers in 
1996 and 58 in 1997. McGwire 
becomes only the second player in 
baseball history with back-to-back, 
50-honie-njn seasons, the other 
being Babe Ruth. 



Dean Smith, winningest coach in 
college basketball histon', retires in 
October after 36 seasons at North 
Carolina. Sports Illustrated names 
him 1997 Sportsman of the Year. 



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Shooling Slar 



Miss Illinois, Katherine Shindle, is 
crowned Miss America 1998. For the 
first time in its 77-year history the 
pageant allows contestants to wear 
two-piece swimsuits in competition. 




Beloved actor Jimmy Stewart dies in July at i 
Stewart's enduring nice-guy popularity' is 
exemplified by It's a Wonderful Life, his 1946 
movie that is now an American cultural icon. 



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I Chelsea CUnton begins her 
freshman year at Stanford 
University in Palo Alto, California. 
Despite security measures, she 
reportedly will lead as normal a 
college life as possible. 





For ttie first time, a computer 
beats a world chess champion 
when IBM's Deep Blue beats 
Russian Garry Kasparov in a 
six-game match in May 1997. 



J.T. MacMIllan, San Diego Union-Tribune 

, Roman Catholic nun Mother Teresa of Calcutta 
dies September 5 at the age of 87. Revered 
for a lifetime of helping the poorest of the 
poor, her many honors include the 1979 Nobel 
Peace Prize. 



Reuters/Archwe Photos 




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American Jody Williams and the 
International Campaign to Ban Land 
Mines are awarded the 1997 Nobel 
Peace Prize in October. The U.S. and 
China refuse to sign an international 
treaty that would ban land mines. 



Ted Turner, vice chairman of the 
Time Warner media empire, pledges 
.$1 billion to United Nations programs. 
It is the largest single gift in 
philanthropic history. 



Former teader of the Soviet Unkm 
Mihhaa GoftMcbev Mms a TV 
commercial for Pizza Hut He 
reportedly cams $1 mMion tor 
the appearance, money he plain 
to u«e to benefit his Gortiactiev 
Foundation. 



Singer John Denver dies in Otti 
at 53 wiien ttie experimental 
', plane he m pMkig crashes into 
Caifomia's Monterey Bay. 




fM Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, 
appears in ads as a spokesperson 
for Weight Watchers International. 
She is the former wife of England's 
Prince Andrew. 



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